How to make a bird box for robins

how to make a bird box for robins

Mar 24, †Ј DIY Bird Box - In this video we look at how to make a bird box for the Eurasian Robin, where to put them and the best methods to use to make these boxes. The. Jan 30, †Ј In this video I show how to make your own Nesting Box / Bird Box / Bird House for a Robin. These Nesting Boxes can attract various small birds which prefer a.

Anthony tobins spending time in the workshop, the kitchen, the garden, and out fishing. Many of his projects are featured in his yard. Anthony Anfuso.

The American robin is one of the most common and recognizable birds. It can be found in backyards all across North America, and it is one of the first roibns to begin nesting each spring. Robins typically build their nests in dense shrubs or in the fork of tree branches.

They are also quite tolerant of human activity, often nesting under roof overhangs and porches where they build their nests on top of light fixtures and similar structures. One enterprising robin raised her brood on the shelf above our hose reel that was attached to the back of the house in a spot that's shaded from the sun and protected from the rain by the overhanging roofline. Robins seldom enter a traditional birdhouse, preferring to nest on open ledges and they will take advantage of a fabricated nesting shelf.

Cardinals, phoebes, and swifts might also take up residence on a vacant shelf to raise their young. Anthony Altorenna. The wood for my nesting shelf came from an old pine box that I bought at a yard sale for 50 cents. I often use what is the important of education wood along with other repurposed bits and leftover pieces from the scrap box to build birdhouses.

The old wood has character and makes for interesting and unique pieces, though sometimes I'll use paint and stain for a fresh look or to disguise its age and flaws. Pine boards are another inexpensive option and are readily available at the local home center. Cedar and redwood are naturally resistant to insects and are a good choice of building material for nest boxes though a bit more expensive.

I've also repurposed pieces of mahogany and teak to build birdhouses and feeders. Left unfinished, most woods will last for several seasons and weather to a nice silvery-gray color. Side section template. Each square is 1" x 1". Note the sloped top edge where the side section meets the roofline. The side pieces feature a wide arc. The curve of the arc is not critical, but I wanted both mak to match.

I sketched several curves on to one of the side pieces until I was happy with the shape. The top of the arc starts about 3" in from the edge of the side. Since I plan to make several nesting shelves, I made a template using a scrap of hardboard. The top edge of the side pieces are cut at a degree angle. The top edges of the side pieces are cut at a degree angle to create a sloped roof to shed the rain and offer some shade from the sun. I used a power miter box to make the angled cuts.

The exact angle of the hos is not critical. The degree roof slope looked good and is steep enough to shed the rain. Cutting a saw kerf in the underside of the roof creates drip edge.

The back edge of the bkx is also cut at nake degree angle to fit tightly against the back section. The kerf will act as a drip edge to help keep rainwater from flowing over the front edge of the roof and dripping down inside the nesting area. The top edge of robinss roof support is cut at the same degree what came before he shot her review as the back edge of the roof section. I used a vird saw with the blade tilted hwo degrees to make the angled cuts.

The basic frame of the nesting shelf is assembled using simple joints, exterior glue, and weather-resistant nails and screws. Dry fit the pieces together before committing to the final assembly with nails and glue, and make any adjustments for a good fit. Start by lining up one side piece with the floor section, using a bead of water-resistant glue and nails or screws to attach the pieces together.

Then attach the other side, making sure that the arcs faced in the same direction. I like to clip off rogins corners of the floor section to create a small opening for drainage.

Attach the front section to the sides and to the bottom section, then attach the roof support piece, making sure that the angled edge is aligned correctly with the top edges of the angled sides. The photo above shows the nest box assembly with the roof support in place.

This piece reinforces the box and provides a brace from attaching the roof. The photo also shows where I filled the nail holes with plastic wood filler. The base section is ready for sanding and paint. The roof is attached to the base of the nest box with screws. Since the front edge of the roof cantilevers over the nesting area without support, the rear edge is attached securely to the base with screws.

To ensure that the screws are positioned correctly, I started by placing the roof upside down on the workbench. After centering the base on the inverted roof, I traced around the edges of the base the pencil lines are darkened with a black Sharpie for the photo. Then, I drilled the holes through the roof. The drills holes are slightly countersunk on the underside.

I flipped the roof over and countersunk the topside of the holes before aligning the roof and attaching it to the base with weather-resistant screws. I repeated the process to align the back section to the base section: position and center the base on the back piece, trace around the base to show where it will connect to the back, then drill and countersink holes for the screws. The robin nest box is now ready for sanding and paint. I removed the back and roof from the base to make it easier to sand and paint each gor the pieces.

After the paint dried, I reattached the roof and back sections to the base. The nesting shelf is ready for occupancy! We attached the new nesting shelf to our shed in an area of our yard that's protected from direct sunlight, wind and rain. It is about 7 feet above the ground to keep the birds away from cats, raccoons and snakes. The shelf is what is wrong with casey kasem a grassy patch, providing a soft landing area for the young fledglings who might crash land on their first flights.

Wikimedia Commons. Robins build their nests on flat surfaces. This nest was built on top of our hose reel.

My daughter put out the sunflower seeds for Mama Bird. Here's another nesting shelf that I made from a discarded suggestion box. Crafts For Kids. Book Repair. Craft Organization. Cross Stitch. Color Facts. Artist Corner. Related Articles. By Anthony Altorenna.

The Cutting List

Feb 24, †Ј Step 1: Attach the Sides. The basic frame of the nesting shelf is assembled using simple joints, exterior glue, and weather-resistant nails and screws. Dry fit the pieces together before committing to the final assembly with nails and glue, and make any adjustments for a . How to Make a Robin Nest Box. Robins build nests in trees or on other structures. Some of us naturally think that the robins that make their nests in the most natural settings will have better success than those that nest on houses. Sure enough, once in a while a baby robin crashes to a hard cement patio and dies when it first fledges from a.

The total area of all gardens in the UK exceeds that of our nature reserves, and as development destroys trees, hedges and old buildings, natural nesting sites are in decline. Nestboxes placed in gardens can make a real difference to the success or failure of a breeding species in an area, especially when accompanied by the regular supply of suitable food and water.

There is no standard, accurate design for a nestbox. Birds do not insist on their nest sites being mathematically precise! What they do require is a nest site which is secure and weatherproof, and as safe as possible from predators. So, make the box to suit the materials available, rather than buying materials to match any given dimensions.

Dimensions need not be precise; make the box to suit the materials available, rather than buying materials to match any given dimensions. Mark out the panels of the future nestbox with pencil and a ruler, and write the name of each panel onto the marked out wood. Whether fixed to a tree or a wall, the height above ground is not critical to most species of bird as long as the box is clear of inquisitive humans and prowling cats.

If there is no natural shelter, it is best to mount a box facing somewhere between south-east and north to avoid strong direct sunlight and the heaviest rain. The box should be tilted slightly forwards so that the roof may deflect the rain from the entrance. You can use nails to attach the box directly to a tree trunk or branch; or you can use rope or wire wrapped right around the box and trunk remembering to protect the trunk from the wire cutting into it by using a piece of rubber underneath it.

Both methods are satisfactory, but obviously annual maintenance is easier if the box is wired and can be taken down easily for cleaning. The number of nestboxes which can be placed in a garden depends on the species you wish to attract. Many species are fiercely territorial, such as blue tits, and will not tolerate another pair close by; about 2 to 3 pairs per acre is the normal density for blue tits.

Other species, such as the tree sparrow, which is a colonial nester, will happily nest side-by-side. Do not place your nestbox close to a birdtable or feeding area, as the regular comings and goings of other birds are likely to prevent breeding in the box. After the end of each breeding season, all nestboxes should be taken down, old nesting materials removed, and the box should be scalded with boiling water to kill any parasites.

Do not use insecticides or flea-powders Ч boiling water is adequate. Annual cleaning is best carried out in October or November. Under the terms of the Wildlife and Countryside Act , if unhatched eggs are found in the box, they can only legally be removed from October to January inclusive, and they must be destroyed Ч it is illegal to keep them.

They have a variety of nest boxes, including specialist boxes for birds such as house martins, swifts and swallows. Nestboxes can harbour parasites so it is good practice to take them down at the end of the season and give them a clean.

Likewise it isЕ. Even a small pond can be home to an interesting range of wildlife, including damsel and dragonflies, frogs and newts. You are here: Home How to build a nesting box for birds. How to build a nesting box for birds.

With natural nesting sites in decline, putting a nestbox in your garden can make all the difference to your local birds. You will need: Rough cut, unplaned, untreated, softwood timber, 15 cm wide x cm long x 1.

Making your nestbox: Mark out the panels of the future nestbox with pencil and a ruler, and write the name of each panel onto the marked out wood. Saw the panels apart. You will need to make a slanted cut between the front panel and roof at a degree angle Decide which box type you want to make and adjust the front panel accordingly: Hole-fronted tit box Ч use a hand brace or drill to make a round entrance hole: 25 mm diameter for blue tits; 28 mm diameter for great tits; 38 mm diameter for sparrows.

Start constructing your box by nailing one of the sides onto the back plate through the back. Nail on the floor this can be quite tricky Ч go carefully to avoid splitting the wood. Nail all the other panels into place except for the roof panel.

If your carpentry is of a high standard, with evenly proportioned panels and snugly fitting joins, you will need to drill some small holes mm diameter into the floor panel to allow for drainage. This should cover the join between the roof and back plate completely, so it is waterproof. Nail the rubber into the back plate first, then pull it tightly over the join and nail it onto the roof.

The roof should be able to lift away like a lid. After construction, treat the outside of the box only with a water-based wood preservative product, such as 'Cuprinol' or 'Sadolin' not creosote , to prolong its life and help repel water. If using planed timber, clear polyurethane may be used instead.

If you have it, fix a piece of roofing felt to the roof to prolong the life of the box and render it even more waterproof. Locating your nestbox: Whether fixed to a tree or a wall, the height above ground is not critical to most species of bird as long as the box is clear of inquisitive humans and prowling cats. Cleaning your nestbox: After the end of each breeding season, all nestboxes should be taken down, old nesting materials removed, and the box should be scalded with boiling water to kill any parasites.

Vine House Farm. More ways you can help wildlife. Action How to clean nestboxes and bird feeders Nestboxes can harbour parasites so it is good practice to take them down at the end of the season and give them a clean.

Action How to create a mini pond Even a small pond can be home to an interesting range of wildlife, including damsel and dragonflies, frogs and newts.

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